Located Outside
Victoria, BC
tropicoletrading@gmail.com
Victoria, BC TROPI-COLE TRADING Palm Trees and More
For Vancouver Island and SW British Columbia
250-478-8996
Can Palm trees survive here?                                                                                  The answer is yes, definitely!  Some people appear not to notice the palms which dot the British Columbia southern coastal areas by the thousands. (Palm trees in Canada!)  Granted, many are not large, since they have been planted only in recent years. Time will reveal their existence as they grow skyward to approx. 10 meters (30 feet). Some have attained that height or more already .  Most are Trachycarpus fortunei, the Windmill Palm, but a number of other varieties do well here with minor protection, and require this only some winters during major Arctic outflow events usually short-lived. What is the best time of year to fertilize a palm?   There are two different approaches to fertilizing palms.  The method I was taught is to fertilizer in spring, April or May, using a slow-release fertilizer which feeds for 6 or 7 months. The idea here is for the nutrients to be exhausted by fall, so the plant is not stimulated during winter months. The other approach is to feed half the nutrients in spring, half in fall. This method is advocated by three universities in the USA, following their study on palm tree care. The universities involved were the University of Florida, the University of Nevada and the University of California, Berkley. It is hard to give up old ideas but I am leaning toward the second method as this provides the palm with energy for the colder months. And, I have been told by an expert enthusiast that his palms produce more fronds per year, using this method. What kind of fertilizer does a Palm tree require? This is a tough one to answer, because like spaghetti recipes, the recipe changes by the block. People use many different types of fertilizers and seem to get good results. Commercially, I have been feeding the palms that I sell, with a slow-release 20 (nitrogen) - 10 (phosphorus) - 10 (potassium) with micro nutrients. It's  just easier to use. You apply it once in the spring and the plants are fed for 6 or 7 months. This is the method I have employed 'till now, but I will likely change to twice-yearly feeding based on the results of a study of palm care carried out by 3 universities in the US. See the Answer to: "What is the best time of year to fertilize a palm"?  I also plan to investigate the use of natural fertilizers as discussed below. Manufactured fertilizer is composed of high numbers like 20-10-10 ... 20-20-20 and some have much higher numbers, whereas natural manure from Horse  is 7 - 3 - 6 and Steer manure is 7 - 3 - 4.  Vegetable-compost numbers are lower still. Those who advocate the use of natural fertilizers claim they not only produce quality plants, but better maintain the health of the soil. Personally, I am starting to move toward a natural approach to fertilizing, at least for my personal plants. I must learn how this might apply to potted plants, commercially, to see if it is possible and even practical. This could involve the use of horse or other manure. (Manure from grazing animals, or plant compost). I have included a compost value list of "everything", courtesy of Lund Produce. Happy fertilizing.                                            http://www.lundproduce.com/N-P-K-Value-of-Everything.html      Should you fertilizer a palm as soon as it is planted?  You can but only if none of the roots on the outside of the root ball are damaged/broken off when removed from it's container. If damaged, avoid stimulating the palm with nutrients until it settles in and puts out new roots at it's own pace. In this situation wait a few weeks before feeding. But you can give it a sprinkling of fine bone meal tossed in as you add the soil around the root ball. If roots are undamaged you can feed at the time of transplanting just as you would if the plant were still in the pot. Bone meal can be added in addition as described immediately above. Should I remove all the soil from the palm roots and dip the roots in a liquid rooting solution before planting? Keep the root ball as intact as possible. I speak from personal experience after trying the bare root/liquid-rooting-solution on a Mediterranean Fan Palm at my home. It didn’t survive. My Palm is rather yellow. Is there something that I can do? Here on the south coast of British Columbia where winter rainfall is abundant, nutrients are leached from the soil. So, besides the yearly or twice yearly feeding of your palm, you can give it some Magnesium (epsom salts). Just a sprinkling on the soil around the palm once or twice a year can help to restore its natural colour.
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2015 - Tropi-Cole Trading
Located Outside
Victoria, BC
tropicoletrading@gmail.com
Victoria, BC Palm Trees and More
For Vancouver Island and SW British Columbia
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250-478-8996 Can Palm trees survive here?                                                                                   The answer is yes, definitely!  Some people appear not to notice the palms which dot the British Columbia southern coastal areas by the thousands. (Palm trees in Canada!)  Granted, many are not large, since they have been planted only in recent years. Time will reveal their existence as they grow skyward to approx. 10 meters (30 feet). Some have attained that height or more already .   Most are Trachycarpus fortunei, the Windmill Palm, but a number of other varieties do well here with minor protection, and require this only some winters during major Arctic outflow events usually short-lived.  What is the best time of year to fertilize a palm?    There are two different approaches to fertilizing palms.  The method I was taught is to fertilizer in spring, April or May, using a slow-release fertilizer which feeds for 6 or 7 months. The idea here is for the nutrients to be exhausted by fall, so the plant is not stimulated during winter months. The other approach is to feed half the nutrients in spring, half in fall. This method is advocated by three universities in the USA, following their study on palm tree care. The universities involved were the University of Florida, the University of Nevada and the University of California, Berkley. It is hard to give up old ideas but I am leaning toward the second method as this provides the palm with energy for the colder months. And, I have been told by an expert enthusiast that his palms produce more fronds per year, using this method.  What kind of fertilizer does a Palm tree require? This is a tough one to answer, because like spaghetti recipes, the recipe changes by the block. People use many different types of fertilizers and seem to get good results. Commercially, I have been feeding the palms that I sell, with a slow-release 20 (nitrogen) - 10 (phosphorus) - 10 (potassium) with micro nutrients. It's  just easier to use. You apply it once in the spring and the plants are fed for 6 or 7 months. This is the method I have employed 'till now, but I will likely change to twice-yearly feeding based on the results of a study of palm care carried out by 3 universities in the US. See the Answer to: "What is the best time of year to fertilize a palm"?  I also plan to investigate the use of natural fertilizers as discussed below. Manufactured fertilizer is composed of high numbers like 20-10-10 ... 20-20-20 and some have much higher numbers, whereas natural manure from Horse  is 7 - 3 - 6 and Steer manure is 7 - 3 - 4.  Vegetable-compost numbers are lower still. Those who advocate the use of natural fertilizers claim they not only produce quality plants, but better maintain the health of the soil. Personally, I am starting to move toward a natural approach to fertilizing, at least for my personal plants. I must learn how this might apply to potted plants, commercially, to see if it is possible and even practical. This could involve the use of horse or other manure. (Manure from grazing animals, or plant compost). I have included a compost value list of "everything", courtesy of Lund Produce. Happy fertilizing.                                            http://www.lundproduce.com/N-P-K-Value-of-Everything.html        Should you fertilizer a palm as soon as it is planted?  You can but only if none of the roots on the outside of the root ball are damaged/broken off when removed from it's container. If damaged, avoid stimulating the palm with nutrients until it settles in and puts out new roots at it's own pace. In this situation wait a few weeks before feeding. But you can give it a sprinkling of fine bone meal tossed in as you add the soil around the root ball. If roots are undamaged you can feed at the time of transplanting just as you would if the plant were still in the pot. Bone meal can be added in addition as described immediately above.  Should I remove all the soil from the palm roots and dip the roots in a liquid rooting solution before planting? Keep the root ball as intact as possible. I speak from personal experience after trying the bare root/liquid-rooting-solution on a Mediterranean Fan Palm at my home. It didn’t survive.   My Palm is rather yellow. Is there something that I can do? Here on the south coast of British Columbia where winter rainfall is abundant, nutrients are leached from the soil. So, besides the yearly or twice yearly feeding of your palm, you can give it some Magnesium (epsom salts). Just a sprinkling on the soil around the palm once or twice a year can help to restore its natural colour. Back Back Back … Back …